Posts Tagged ‘Web MD’

Brain Tumor, Stroke and 8 other Illnesses you probably don’t have

Monday, June 13th, 2011


 


 

Does Dr. Wikipedia make House Calls? Today, it seems about anybody with access to a laptop or an iPod Touch can attempt to diagnose his own medical problems in the time it takes to access 911. You can look up your pain symptoms online at Wikipedia, Google your nearest pharmacy, or order over-the-counter medication at drugstore.com.

BRAIN TUMOR, STROKE AND 8 OTHER ILLNESSES YOU PROBABLY DON'T HAVE,WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Indeed, we are privileged to have immediate access to such a bountiful source of information. However,  there is a flip side to that. Spend enough time reading about lung cancer, brain tumors or Alzheimer’s; you might one day become convinced that you, yourself, suffer the exact symptoms described on WebMD. In fact, may physicians report receiving an unusually high number of visits from patients who mistakenly believe they suffer from certain life-threatening illnesses.

BRAIN TUMOR, STROKE AND 8 OTHER ILLNESSES YOU PROBABLY DON'T HAVE,WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Below are the 10 most common illnesses from which many people often erroneously believe they suffer, as reported by Dr. Sharon Orrange on Daily Strength:

1) Brain tumor: Some chronic headache sufferers have anxiety about brain tumors.  They believe constant head pain, vision problems, dizziness or numbness, must signal a brain tumor. While some of the symptoms associated with migraine with aura are similar to those of a brain tumor, the chances that your headaches result from a brain tumor are very rare.

2) Kidney disorder: Many individuals who suffer from lower back pain become concerned that they have kidney problems, or possibly a tumor in that region.  Pain alone does not signify a dysfunctional kidney, say most doctors.  Unless painful urination is a factor, your back pain is probably due to sore muscles.

3) Stroke: Numbness in the arms or legs can be an indication of stroke, though that is just one symptom of many. Additionally, the numbness associated with stroke symptoms occurs on only one side of the body, an important distinction. Still, if you suspect you have suffered a stroke, and then call 911.

4) Lymphoma: While not every bump under the skin’s surface indicates skin cancer, it is crucial to see a doctor if lymphoma is suspected. If you are concerned over a bump that you have had for months or years, then you most likely do not have lymphoma, which generally advances quickly.

5) Gut parasites: If you have traveled to a foreign country in the past few years, then you might become anxious about developing a parasite in your gut, BRAIN TUMOR, STROKE AND 8 OTHER ILLNESSES YOU PROBABLY DON'T HAVE,WWW.MIGRAVENT.COMespecially if you suffer from diarrhea, indigestion or heartburn.  The chances of having a tapeworm in your digestive system are rare.  If stomach upset continues for months, then you might suffer from a gastrointestinal disorder, which can be determined by visiting a physician who specializes in gastroenterology.

6) Alzheimer’s disease: Brain fog, short-term memory loss or forgetfullness could suggest symptoms such as fibromyalgia, vitamin B12 deficiency, depression, or chronic fatigue. If you are under middle age, then the chances that you suffer from any sort of dementia similar to Alzheimer’s are exceptionally rare.

7) Shingles: Shingles is a  painful, itchy rash that can take weeks to heal. If you have ever had Chicken Pox, then you might develop shingles in later life.  One distinguishing trait of shingles is that it occurs only on one side of the body, usually in the upper region, but never on both sides at the same time.

BRAIN TUMOR, STROKE AND 8 OTHER ILLNESSES YOU PROBABLY DON'T HAVE,WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

8) Colon cancer: The appearance of bright red blood after a stool movement is usually a symptom of hemorrhoids. In any case, only a doctor’s visit can rule out colon cancer.

9) Lung cancer: If you have had a bad cold or infection, then you’re likely to have a persistent cough that could take weeks to disappear. That does not necessarily mean you have pneumonia, and the chances of having lung cancer are even more remote. Nevertheless, keep your doctor informed about any health concerns you might have.

10) Herniated disc: Hernias are more common among men than they are in women. The symptoms of hernias are pain or tenderness in the lower abdomen or groins and heartburn.Visit your doctor for a checkup if you feel lasting pain in that region.

BRAIN TUMOR, STROKE AND 8 OTHER ILLNESSES YOU PROBABLY DON'T HAVE,WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Also read:

6 Migraine Myth-conceptions

Best 10 Hospitals in the USA for Chronic Migraine Patients

4 Headaches that Require Emergency Intervention

Migraine Pain, Portrayed through Art and Poetry

Sources:

Wall Street Journal http://on.wsj.com/kMnHpU

Daily Strength http://bit.ly/m7apbx

Livestrong http://bit.ly/jFY1UC

NY Times http://bit.ly/bT2UE9

Medicine Net http://bit.ly/h2PSlS

Considering Botox for Headache Relief? Read This First…

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011


 


 

Botox injections aren’t only used by celebrities such as Kim Kardashian to remove wrinkles and laugh lines; since the FDA’s approval of Botox (botulinum toxin) treatments for headache relief, many chronic migraine sufferers have been flocking to their nearest plastic surgery practitioner for their tri-monthly injections.

CONSIDERING BOTOX FOR HEADACHE RELIEF? READ THIS FIRST..., WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Kim Kardashian

Read: Botox for Migraines: Is it Safe?

Botox essentially works by blocking nerves, paralyzing certain facial muscles, and thus eliminating even fine wrinkles caused by laughing, frowning, sleeping or weeping. Overuse of botox treatments often results in a “plastic” expression, as exhibited by celebrities such as Michael Jackson: a face devoid of emotion.

Study reveals unhealthy side effects of Botox injections

A new study reveals another surprising and disturbing side effect of Botox treatments: an inability to perceive emotions in others. The same drug which reduces one’s ability to express emotions like sadness, happiness, fear or anger might also impair that person’s ability to understand similar emotional signals from their peers.

  • The study, published by Social Psychological and Personality Science, was conducted by researchers from USC and Duke University in an attempt to understand why similar dermal fillers such as Restylane or Juvederm have no such correlation with emotional aptitude.
  • USC psychology professor David T. Neal believes it is Botox’s specific ability to freeze facial muscles which hampers one’s ability to perceive others’ facial expressions.
  • People learn how to express, label and understand emotions through mimicry (monkey see, monkey do).  We smile when we’re happy because we see other people smiling while in a good mood, and we understand the connection. But take away the ability to smile, to express similar feelings of gratitude or satisfaction, and that connection is lost.
CONSIDERING BOTOX FOR HEADACHE RELIEF? READ THIS FIRST..., WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Michael Jackson

  • In this study, women who used Restylane to remove wrinkles demonstrated emotional aptitude of 77 percent accuracy.
  • Women who opted for Botox treatments were presented with photographs exhibiting facial expressions; only 70 percent of participants who received Botox injections were accurate in perceiving emotions.
  • This new research suggests that there is a flip side to the mind/body connection; that in some situations, it is the body which has a direct effect on the mind. Read more about “embodiment” at the National Center for Biotechnology Information.
  • Many neuroscientists attribute “mirroring” to a brain circuit which helps us understand feelings and motives of others, an essential tool which is deadened by frequent Botox injections.
  • Other possible side effects of excessive Botox usage include speech impediments, bruising, redness, muscular weakness or hives.

Also read:

Relieve Your Headaches With Yoga: Try These Moves!

Celebrities Also Suffer from Migraines

Sources:

LA Times, Web MD, USA Today, Health.com