Posts Tagged ‘magnesium’

Magnesium for Migraines- Dr. Hyman Agrees!

Thursday, January 9th, 2014


 


 

Renowned naturopathic expert Dr. Hyman recommends magnesium for migraines, and we couldn’t agree more! Magnesium and vitamin B deficiencies are just a few examples of migraine triggers that the groundbreaking physician addresses in his most recent report on migraine treatments that work.

Magnesium for Migraines- Dr. Hyman Agrees!

Migraine triggers

Migraines are a neurological illness that plagues millions of people all around the globe. Despite the rising incidence of migraine disorder in individuals of all cultures, there yet remains no actual cure for migraines.

Rather, prevention is in important key in managing migraines; by reducing the number of migraine triggers in your life, you have a better chance of avoiding migraine attacks and minimizing the impact that migraines have on your life.

Natural suggestions

In his article on effective ways to prevent migraines, Dr. Hyman suggests two nutrients that are included in most natural migraine supplements: magnesium and vitamin B2 (riboflavin).

Here are his 5 recommendations for preventing migraines:

1) Magnesium

A startling number of migraine patients suffer from magnesium deficiency without even realizing it. Magnesium relaxes the muscles, and a deficiency naturally results in frequent headaches and an increase in underlying migraine attacks. In his practice, he regularly prescribes magnesium for chronic migraine headache patients with excellent results, without the need for painkillers.

2) Vitamin B2

Another deficiency he mentions is riboflavin; Dr. Hyman has seen where prescribing vitamin B2 supplementation has helped a vast number of his migraine patients, and he recommends it often.

3) Restrictive dieting

It’s not always clear which foods are responsible for triggering migraines, as it differs for each individual. For that reason, it’s helpful to experiment with removing certain foods from your diet for a few weeks or one month, and see what happens when they’re reintroduced. You may find that an allergy to wheat, dairy, or even eggs is behind most of your migraine attacks!

4) Gluten-free

It’s controversial, but a rising number of people have found that removing gluten from their diet has resulted in better health, including reduction or complete elimination of chronic illness ailments such as migraines headaches and joint pain. To prevent inflammation from gluten, Dr. Hyman suggests avoiding gluten from wheat, barley, rye, oats, and spelt.

5) Hormones

If your migraines are hormonal, then your chances of preventing migraines are better if you take the time to relax, increase exercise, sleep better, and avoid alcohol, sugar, and starches.

About Dr. Hyman

Dr. Hyman authored the term “functional medicine” as a revolutionary means of finding the root cause of all chronic illness, including migraines, without depending solely on conventional prescription medications and “western” approaches to chronic care.

Functional medicine combines the best of both worlds- natural alternative complementary medicine treatments that don’t discard essential modern medical discoveries of the day.

Dr. Hyman has received many awards for his medical achievements, and currently holds a position as medical editor at the Huffington Post.

Tell us about yourself!

Have you tried experimenting with natural approaches to migraine therapy? Some popular nutrients include riboflavin, butterbur, coenzyme Q10, and magnesium.

How often do you get migraine headaches? Do you get migraine attacks without the headache?

Would you consider using natural treatments to reduce your need for pain relievers such as ibuprofen and opioids?

Please leave your comments below!

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The 4 Best Vitamins to Help Headaches

Top 25 Natural Migraine Treatments: Vitamins, Minerals, and Herb

Image courtesy of Naypong

The 4 Best Vitamins to Help Headaches

Thursday, October 31st, 2013


 


 

There’s a growing interest in using supplemental vitamins to help headaches among migraine sufferers, and for good reason. Over the years, scientists have found convincing proof that supplementing with vitamin B2, magnesium, Coenzyme Q10, and butterbur yields substantially high results in migraine efficacy, while also sustaining optimum neurological and vascular health. Listed are the four best vitamins to help headaches.

The 4 Best Vitamins to Help Headaches

Nearly 15% of all people suffer the effects of migraine disorder. Disproportionately, most migraine sufferers are females. Symptoms of migraine attacks range from excruciating headaches (throbbing, piercing) and nausea to debilitating fatigue and visual disorders (aura, flashes of light, loss of peripheral vision). A migraine attack can last for hours or days, and often require a day’s recovery.

Vitamins to help headaches

While migraine abortive medicines and painkillers provide relief and maintenance, they can have harmful side effects that worsen with time.  That’s why headache specialists recommend incorporating a healthy blend of specific vitamins that help headaches into your migraine management plan.

Natural Migraine Treatments that Work: Visit an Osteopath!

The most commonly recommended vitamins and other natural ingredients for migraines are listed below:

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)

Scientists have noted riboflavin (vitamin B2) deficiency as a possible trigger of migraine headaches in certain patients. Therefore, riboflavin is seen as one of the best vitamins to help headaches related to migraine. In studies published by the journal Headache, chronic migraine and tension headache sufferers who started using 25 mg doses of riboflavin daily noticed better results almost immediately.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), 400 mg per day of riboflavin is significantly beneficial and completely safe for people suffering from migraine headache attacks.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) in Natural Migraine Ingredients

Magnesium

For people suffering from migraines resulting from high blood pressure, magnesium can be exceedingly helpful. Magnesium relaxes the walls of your arteries, improving the flow of blood and oxygen in the veins near your head. Doctors recommend about 400 mg of magnesium taken one to two times daily.

Magnesium- Still Magnificent for Migraines

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an often overlooked nutrient that has been proven to help headaches for people who suffer chronic migraines, often yielding a 50% success rate. Taken daily, 300 mg of CoQ10 helps to boost energy in the chromosomes, providing balance in many biochemical functions of the brain.

Coenzyme Q10 Benefits and Dosage Information

Butterbur (Petasites hybridus)

It’s not a vitamin, but butterbur is also recommended by many migraine specialists for its ability to drastically help headaches. Butterbur is a European shrubbery that has been used for centuries for its beneficial properties in helping sufferers of headache, chronic pain, fever, and muscle spasms.

Some butterbur treatments may contain toxic elements, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which are normally removed by special processing. When choosing butterbur supplements to help migraine headaches, make sure they are PA-free.

Butterbur Supplements for Migraines- Are they Safe?

Please tell us…

Which vitamins do you take to help headaches?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

Top 25 Natural Migraine Treatments: Vitamins, Minerals, and Herb



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Natural Migraine Treatments that Work: Visit an Osteopath!

Tuesday, October 15th, 2013






To prevent migraines, it’s helpful to include natural migraine treatments into your daily life, in addition to consulting in a naturopathic doctor who specializes in chronic migraines. An osteopath is one such alternative medicine practitioner who can provide amazing results in a few office visits.

Natural Migraine Treatments that Work: Visit an Osteopath!

What is osteopathy?

Many migraine headaches are triggered or worsened by stress, tense muscles, injuries, sinus pressure and incorrect posture. Osteopathy is a natural therapy that can help to relieve migraine headaches by correcting such blockages, improper joint structure, and stiff muscles that can lead to chronic headaches such as migraine.

Although osteopathy uses science-based knowledge on musculoskeletal behavior in helping people with chronic pain, it is still considered by conventional medicine as a branch of alternative natural therapy.

For migraine sufferers, many osteopaths will prescribe natural migraine treatments containing vitamins, herbs, and minerals, in addition to performing manual osteopathic therapy.

(Natural ingredients that help migraines include magnesium, butterbur, riboflavin, and coenzyme Q-10.)

How can osteopathy help migraines?

Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) is a hands-on approach to adjusting underlying physical conditions that cause chronic pain and illness, including headaches, vertigo, muscle pain, and tinnitus, all of which are common symptoms of migraine disorder.

Here are some of the many benefits of osteopathy for treating migraines:

  • Improving circulation of blood and bodily fluids in the lymphatic system
  • Correcting oxygen blockages caused by hypertension
  • Releasing tension in the muscles, joints, and nerves
  • Targeting blockages and tension that trigger migraine headaches
  • Preventing painful muscles spasms
  • Restoring basic function and mobility
  • Promoting natural healing

Are Migraines Really Triggered by Stress?

Besides migraines, an osteopath can also help to relive asthma, sinus disorders, carpal tunnel syndrome, vertigo, tinnitus, and menstrual pain.

What will my osteopath do?

Listed are some of the basic techniques osteopaths use to treat migraines naturally:

  • Articulation – carrying an impaired joint through its natural range of motion for relieving shoulder or neck pain
  • Counterstrain – correcting improper reflexes by administering slight pressure to certain counter areas
  • Muscle energy – controlled positioning by the patient, as directed by the doctor, in a way that corrects imbalances that may be triggering migraine headaches
  • Myofascial release – manual massaging of muscle tissues to relieve pain
  • Soft tissue techniques – correction and treatment of skeletal muscles and joint abnormalities that can cause migraine headaches

Please tell us…

Have you visited an osteopath who provides good natural treatments for migraines? Please share your experiences.

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

Acupuncture for Migraines

Top 25 Natural Migraine Treatments: Vitamins, Minerals, and Herbs

Image courtesy of marin/freedigitalphotos

Magnesium- Still Magnificent for Migraines

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013


 


 

When it comes to migraine research on natural supplements, experts still agree that magnesium yields the most promising results. Fads and “miracle cures” come and go, but certain natural migraine tactics, including magnesium, have withstood the test of time. Here is what the leading experts in migraine headache prevention have to say about magnesium.

Magnesium- Still Magnificent for Migraines

In Therapeutic uses of magnesium, published by American Family Physician, magnesium is touted as an essential mineral for optimal metabolic function that nevertheless is declining in most food sources. As a result, magnesium depletion has been diagnosed in large numbers of patients suffering from chronic pain such as migraines.

“This has led to an increased awareness of proper magnesium intake and its potential therapeutic role in a number of medical conditions.  Studies have shown the effectiveness of magnesium in eclampsia and preeclampsia, arrhythmia, severe asthma, and migraine.” (Excerpt from American Family Physician)

In The Clinical Journal of Pain, an article entitled Foods and supplements in the management of migraine headaches further stresses the benefit of magnesium for people with migraines by naming magnesium as the single most preferred natural supplement, followed by butterbur, coenzyme Q10, and riboflavin.

“…given the myriad side effects of traditional prescription medications, there is an increasing demand for “natural” treatment like vitamins and supplements for common ailments such as headaches.” (Excerpt from The Clinical Journal of Pain)

According to Dr. Sarah DeRossett, American neurologist and headache specialist, “About 15 to 20 percent of the American population is deficient in magnesium, and patients who have migraines have lower blood levels of magnesium than patients who don’t have migraines.”

Symptoms of magnesium deficiency can include:

  • Headaches
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Irregular heartbeats
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Insomnia
  • Brain fog
  • Difficulty coordinating body movements

Your turn!

Have you had success using magnesium for migraines?

Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

Share with your friends!

If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

Like this? Read more:

5 Foods that Help with Migraines

Getting Enough Magnesium…Are you?

Coenzyme Q10 Benefits and Dosage Information

Image courtesy of marin/freedigitalphotos

Magnesium: For Migraines, it’s Magnificent

Monday, April 15th, 2013


 


 

How does magnesium help with migraines? Let us count the ways…Magnesium is an essential nutrient that targets many of the physical and neurological migraine triggers which increase your risk for chronic migraine attacks.

Magnesium: For Migraines, it’s Magnificent- Migravent

No one “miracle cure” can stop migraines, but that doesn’t mean you don’t have options. To prevent or lower migraine attacks, it’s important to be able to reduce the number of triggers in your life that result in symptoms of migraines, such as crushing headaches, nausea, dizziness, eye pain, and intense fatigue.

Magnesium reduces triggers

In addition to avoiding food ingredients that cause migraines, it helps to know what nutrients you should take to lower your risk for an attack.

Of all the natural supplements that benefit migraine patients, magnesium is one of the most talked-about, and for good reason…

Many scientific studies have confirmed an unusually high incidence of magnesium deficiency in patients of migraine disorder, leading researchers to believe that low levels of magnesium may be a common trigger of chronic migraines.

Magnesium- for Migraines and Beyond

Magnesium is also good for your heart, mental health, and your nervous system; it will help you sleep better, digest food more effectively, and stay hydrated.

Supplementing with magnesium helps your body function normally, thus improving your chances of having a migraine-free day, week, month…and life.

Magnesium benefits, in a nutshell

Magnesium promotes hundreds of crucial biochemical reactions throughout your body. Here are some of the top benefits that magnesium provides in managing migraines.

• Magnesium helps to maintain healthy blood pressure.

• Magnesium helps to relax the muscles.

• Magnesium supports good bone density.

• Magnesium supplementation prevents symptoms of deficiency that increase your risk for stroke and heart disease, both of which are also correlated to migraines.

• Magnesium has proved beneficial for patients suffering from depression, insomnia, anxiety, and agitation, comorbid conditions of migraine.

    How much magnesium do I need?

    Most of us don’t get nearly enough magnesium from diet alone. Some of the riches sources- kelp, nuts, and wheat germ- are not staple ingredients of the American diet.

    Not only that, but the foods that many of us do consume in abundance- sugar, salt, and sodas- are all notorious for draining magnesium from your body and causing magnesium deficiency.

    The only way to make certain you’re getting enough magnesium is to take it in pill form.

    To prevent magnesium deficiency and manage migraines more efficiently, doctors recommend taking about 400 to 1,000 mg of magnesium supplements each day.

    Your turn!

    Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

    Share with your friends!

    If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, twitter, or Facebook.

    Like this? Read more:

    Top 25 Natural Migraine Treatments: Vitamins, Minerals, and Herbs

    Vitamin B2- Why Riboflavin Rules for Migraines

    Coenzyme Q10 Benefits with Migraines

    Sources:

    Top 5 Health Benefits of Magnesium

    Magnesium: The Most Powerful Relaxation Mineral Available

    Image(s) courtesy of chokphoto/FreeDigitalPhotos.net


    Introducing Natural Ingredients for Migraines- Tips for Success

    Monday, May 21st, 2012


     


     

    Are you satisfied with your current chronic headache medicine? If not, join the club. Many chronic migraine patients would like to try natural ingredients, but either don’t know how or are too intimidated to take that first leap of faith.  But with help from your headache specialist, you can join the increasing number of migraine and chronic headache patients using natural ingredients for migraines.

    SWITCHING FROM MIGRAINE DRUGS TO NATURAL REMEDIES- TIPS FOR SUCCESS

    A word about addiction

    Remember, taking painkillers for migraines or chronic headache does not lead to addiction! There’s an important difference between addiction and dependence.  Drug addicts take narcotics for the high, not because they need them medically.

    Chemical dependency occurs when you can’t stop taking a medication because of the pain you will suffer as a result, and this gets to be a problem if:

    • Side effects become intolerable or dangerous
    • Your develop a tolerance for the drug

    And that, dear friends, is what drives so many chronic pain sufferers to natural alternative medicine for migraine headaches.

    SWITCHING FROM MIGRAINE DRUGS TO NATURAL REMEDIES- TIPS FOR SUCCESS

    Tips for success

    Please do not try weaning off prescription medications or introducing new migraine treatments without your doctor’s approval. This is not medical advice, just encouragement gathered from likeminded migraine sufferers on the web. For a tapering regimen, consult your doctor.

    • For treating MOH headaches, wean off gradually, not suddenly.
    • Don’t expect immediate results. Once you start weaning off painkillers, it can take a few months before you start experiencing relief.
    • During those first two or three months, expect to suffer withdrawal symptoms- immense headaches, irritability, mood swings, delirium, vomiting, night sweats, and seizures. It’s part of the process as toxins leave your body.
    • If possible, consider weaning off painkillers as an inpatient at a hospital.
    • Do not attempt to wean off beta-blockers for migraines on your own- it must be done with help from your physician.  Remember to have your heart rate checked often, and report symptoms of rebound hypertension, like anxiety, dizziness, and chest pain.
    • In addition to weaning off prescription painkillers or NSAIDs, remember to also supplement with natural herbs, vitamins, and minerals for optimum health benefits.
    • Remember the hot and cold rule- to relieve chronic headaches, apply heat.  For migraines, use a cold pack.
    • If at any point, you feel that you cannot tolerate withdrawal symptoms, or feel that you are in danger, do not hesitate to contact your doctor, or emergency services.

    Please tell us…

    Have you weaned off prescription or OTC medications for migraines and noticed an improvement in pain symptoms?  What natural ingredients do you currently use?

    Please share your success story!

    Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

    Share with your friends!

    If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, Facebook, or Google+.

    Read more about natural remedies for migraines

    Introducing Natural Ingredients for Migraines: What are the Benefits?

    New: Alternative Medicine for Migraines Endorsed by the American Academy of Neurology

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for Chronic Pain

    References:

    How to Taper Off Beta Blockers

    A Hidden Cause of Headache Pain

    Rebound Headache Cycle: How to Safely Taper off Medications

    Images:

    YaiSirichaiphotostock

    Introducing Natural Ingredients for Migraines: What are the Benefits?

    Friday, May 18th, 2012


     


     

    Are you satisfied with your current chronic headache medicine? If not, join the club. Many chronic migraine patients would like to try natural ingredients, but either don’t know how or are too intimidated to take that first leap of faith.  But with help from your headache specialist, you can join the increasing number of migraine and chronic headache patients using natural ingredients for migraines.

    Switching from Migraine Drugs to Natural Remedies: What are the Benefits?

    Migraineurs Catch-22

    It’s a lose/lose situation: your doctor tells you to limit your use of both OTC and prescription painkillers, lest you get the dreaded medication overuse headache (MOH), in addition to migraine headaches.  So you take migraine prophylaxis meds like Topamax, to prevent migraines from occurring, and what do you get?

    More often than not, side effects like:

    • Lack of concentration (brain fog)
    • Fatigue
    • Memory loss
    • Painful tingling sensations
    • Weight gain
    • Hair loss
    • Muscular pain and joint stiffness
    • Rebound headache

    It’s enough to make you want to ditch the drugs and go au naturel.

    Brain Drain from Migraines…What’s Causing it?

    Go natural!

    Introducing natural migraine ingredients is no pipe dream, but it does take a lot of courage and determination.

    Here are some proven benefits:

    By successfully incorporating natural migraine ingredients, you save yourself from the side effects attributed to prescription migraine treatments:

    Many migraine sufferers who introduce ingredients like magnesium, coenzyme Q10, riboflavin, and butterbur into their diet increase their chances of attaining neurological health conducive to life without migraines.

    Migraine patients who use a combination of natural ingredients and prescription migraine medications notice  dramatic results.

    Please tell us…

    Have you weaned off prescription or OTC medications for migraines and noticed an improvement in pain symptoms?

    What natural supplements do you currently use?

    Please share your success story!

    Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

    Share with your friends!

    If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, Facebook, or Google+.

    Read more about natural remedies for migraines

    Introducing Natural Ingredients for Migraines- Tips for Success

    New: Alternative Medicine for Migraines Endorsed by the American Academy of Neurology

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for Chronic Pain

    References:

    A Hidden Cause of Headache Pain

    Images:

    Emuishere Peliculas

    Migraines, Women, and Depression: 9 Myths and Truths

    Thursday, May 17th, 2012


     


     

    Migraines and depression often go hand in hand, creating a vicious circle of pain, exhaustion, and despair.  How can you tell the difference between depression caused by chronic migraines, female-related depression, and clinical depression? Here are 9 points on depression in women with migraines.

    MIGRAINES, WOMEN, AND DEPRESSION: 9 MYTHS AND TRUTHS

    Myth #1: Women are more susceptible to migraines and depression.

    True. For every male migraineur, there are three women suffering from migraine headaches on a regular basis.

    To add insult to injury, women are also more likely to suffer from severe depression than their male peers are.  While only one out of eight men ever becomes clinically depressed, 25% of all women will experience deep depression at least once in their lives, according to the National Institutes of Health.

    Women get the Lion’s Share of Migraines and Chronic Pain

    Myth #2: Stress causes migraines and depression in women.

    True. Many health experts believe that stress and depression occur in the same part of the brain.  Particularly in women, who are less likely than are men to release pent-up anger, long-term stress and trauma often result in constant depression.

    And while stress doesn’t actually “cause migraines,” it does make them more likely to occur; stress, along with other migraine triggers, creates an environment in the brain that is conducive for chronic migraines.  That’s why migraine prevention requires being able to determine what factors trigger migraines, and finding ways to eliminate or reduce them.

    Can Anxiety Attacks cause Migraines?

    Myth #3: You can cure depression- and migraines- by learning how to reduce stress and think positively.

    MIGRAINES, WOMEN, AND DEPRESSION: 9 MYTHS AND TRUTHS

    False. Clinical depression and migraines are both illnesses that are caused by brain chemistry.  While thinking positively and learning how to relax are excellent ways to lift your mood and improve your response to migraine or depression medications, stress reduction alone cannot cure you of a neurological or mental illness.

    Myth #4: It’s normal to be depressed for weeks, sometimes months.

    False. It’s normal to be sad for long periods after suffering a trauma or a loss, but sadness that lingers longer than several weeks requires psychiatric help.

    Myth #5: To treat depression, you must take antidepressants.

    False. Not all periods of depression are “clinical depression,” so not all symptoms indicate an imbalance in brain chemistry requiring antidepressants.

    Some underlying factors may cause depression, including:

    • PMS
    • Multiple sclerosis
    • Vitamin deficiency
    • Rheumatoid arthritis
    • Hypothyroidism
    • Medications like birth control or hypertension treatments
    • Insomnia
    • Drug or alcohol abuse

    Myth #6: “Baby blues” only occur after giving birth.

    MIGRAINES, WOMEN, AND DEPRESSION: 9 MYTHS AND TRUTHS

    False. We’ve all heard of postpartum depression, but very little mention is made of its cousin, antenatal depression, which occurs during a pregnancy. Fluctuating hormones cause depression in 10% of all pregnancies.

    Ironically, migraine attacks often slow down or cease for many pregnant migraine patients.

    Myth #7: Some antidepressants and migraine medications are safe to take during pregnancy.

    True. If you suffer from migraines or depression, don’t let that stop you from family planning.  Ask your doctor about many conventional treatments for migraines and depression, including:

    • Zoloft
    • Prozac
    • Celexa

    Popular natural ingredients that promote a positive mind and mood:

    • Magnesium
    • Riboflavin
    • Coenzyme Q10
    • PA-free butterbur

    Myth #8: Symptoms of migraines and depression may vary.

    True. Between male and female sufferers of both depression and migraines, symptoms may differ from patient to patient.

    Depression symptoms include:

    • Deep sadness
    • Fatigue
    • Feelings of despair, shame, or guilt
    • Irritability
    • Indifference
    • Mood swings
    • Obsession with suicidal thoughts

    Suicide Rate in Migraine Patients- Some Surprising Statistics

    Migraines may occur with or without aura, or even without headache.  Symptoms of migraines include:

    • Pounding pervasive headache
    • Headaches that last for days
    • Sharp pain behind the eyes
    • Sensitivity to bright lights, loud noise, scents, and bold black/white patterns
    • Nausea
    • Diarrhea
    • Vomiting
    • Fatigue
    • Dizziness
    • Bizarre visual disturbances (lights, colorful zigzags)
    • Temporary partial blindness
    • Temporary partial paralysis
    • Sudden speech difficulties
    • Loss of spatial awareness

    MIGRAINES, WOMEN, AND DEPRESSION: 9 MYTHS AND TRUTHS

    Myth #9: Natural ingredients for migraines and depression are ineffective and unsafe.

    True and false. Don’t believe that all herbs and homeopathic treatments are safe just because they’re natural.  Homeopathic, herbal, and nutritional supplements can provide powerful health benefits, but it’s important to use them with care.

    • Always consult in your physician before starting any new natural herbal ingredient for migraines.
    • Seek quality products that are free of chemicals like pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) or pesticides.
    • Leading neurologists advocate the health benefits of natural ingredients; they include butterbur, riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and magnesium.

    Please tell us…

    What tactics, including natural and conventional, do you currently use for migraines and/or depression?

    Do you have any questions or suggestions?  Please leave your comments below.

    Share with your friends!

    If you found this article helpful, then please share with your friends, family, and coworkers by email, Facebook, or Google+.

    Read more about migraines and depression

    Chronic Migraines- Weathering the Emotional Storm

    Migraines Make Women Depressed- It’s Confirmed

    Images:

    IAN HOOTON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY, LEON HARRIS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY, ZERO CREATIVES/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY


    Mommy Migraines linked with Colic in Babies- Breaking News!

    Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012


     


     

    Suffering from migraine headaches is painful enough…now, a new report says that mommy migraine sufferers are more than twice as likely to have babies with colic than non-migraine headache sufferers, leading experts to wonder if colic in infants is an early symptom of migraines.

    MOMMY MIGRAINE SUFFERERS HAVE MORE COLICKY BABIES- BREAKING NEWS! MIGRAVENT

    Migraines from birth?  Maybe…

    In a recent University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) study, child neurologist Dr. Amy Gelfand surveyed 154 moms with migraines, and made this startling discovery:

    Mothers who have a history of migraines are 2 ½ times more likely to have babies that show symptoms of colic, compared with moms who have no history of migraines.

    Where 11% of non-migraineur mothers have colicky babies, a much higher percentage- 29 percent- of mothers who suffer from migraines give birth to babies who cry around the clock and appear to be suffering from a mysterious pain for which there is no relief.

    MOMMY MIGRAINE SUFFERERS HAVE MORE COLICKY BABIES- BREAKING NEWS! MIGRAVENT

    Colic attacks or migraine attacks?

    Moms have been fretting over colicky babies ever since the Stone Age.  For years, scientists have wondered what causes this mysterious affliction that begins at the age of two months and may continue well into toddlerhood.

    Symptoms of colic include fussiness, abnormal crying patterns, excessive crying, restlessness, inability to sleep through the night, and a general impression that your baby is suffering from some sort of immense pain that cannot be relieved.  (Sound like migraines?)

    “We’ve known about colic for a really long time,” Dr. Gelfand says, “but despite this fact, no one really knows why these babies are crying.”

    MOMMY MIGRAINE SUFFERERS HAVE MORE COLICKY BABIES- BREAKING NEWS! MIGRAVENTIn recent years, speculations have been made linking colic with gastrointestinal problems.  Debates raged over whether or not bottle-fed babies suffer more colic than breast-fed babies do, insinuating that mothers who feed their babies infant formulas are unintentionally harming them.  Grandmother tonics abound, promising to relieve gas pains that indicate colic.

    After 50 years of research, we are still no closer to understanding what causes colic in infants, nor how to cure it.  Now, this promising new research sheds a new light on infant colic by introducing migraine disorder as a potential factor.

    Infant migraine therapy

    If colic in babies is really one of the first symptoms of migraine attacks, then we can use this information to begin safe, effective therapy from an early age- colic therapy, combined with migraine prevention.

    Here are some effective migraine therapies and coping mechanisms that are worth investigating:

    Reduce stimulation. We know that certain things trigger migraines; why not use this approach to ease colic in babies?  If you know that bright lights and strong scents trigger your own migraine attacks, then consider keeping the lights down for your own baby, and switching to non-scented baby lotions and cleansers.

    Keep a migraine diary. Keep a log of your baby’s sleeping and crying patterns, noting when you breastfed or bottle-fed.  If you breastfeed, also take notes on what you ate.  Also include other factors like weather, runny nose, coughing, doctor’s checkups, and vaccinations.  In a few weeks, you may have enough information to provide some helpful clues as to what’s triggering your baby’s colic (or migraine) attack.

    Hydrate. Dehydration sometimes triggers migraines, so make doubly certain that your baby is well fed, and receives proper hydration.  If you live in an arid environment, then consider using a hot/cold humidifier.

    Keep things regular. The migraine brain is not flexible- it prefers rigid schedules.  Try to implement as much regularity into your baby’s day as possible.  Even if the only constant seems to be her continuous screaming, you still have some control over her daily timetable.

    • Put her down for naps at home and always at the same times each day.
    • Go for walks in the mornings or afternoons, but always at the same time of day, every day.
    • Try to feed only at regular intervals.  This can be challenging, because all of your natural instincts tell you to comfort your baby in any way possible, and nothing is more comforting for your baby than a warm breast or bottle of milk.  Use your best judgment on this.

    Ask your doctor about baby vitamins. Much research has been done on the link between migraines and vitamin deficiency.  In several cited studies, patients who received doses of riboflavin and magnesium saw a dramatic results.  Many infant vitamin supplements are available, but you should consult your child pediatrician before using.  Ask specifically about the safety of magnesium and vitamin B2 (riboflavin) supplements for infants.

    Begin migraine treatments from the womb. If migraines are part of your family history, then you should consider using migraine treatments that are safe, natural, and free of side effects.  Consult your OB/GYN about the safety of taking supplements like magnesium, coenzyme Q10, riboflavin, and butterbur.

    MOMMY MIGRAINE SUFFERERS HAVE MORE COLICKY BABIES- BREAKING NEWS! MIGRAVENT

    Please tell us…

    • Are you a mom with migraines and if so, did your babies suffer from colic?
    • Do have grown children who had colic as infants, and now struggle with migraines?
    • How do you think scientists can use this information to better our understanding of migraines?

    As always, we welcome your comments and questions!

    Spread the love…

    Please share this article with your friends, family, or anybody you care about!

    Read more about migraines and pregnancy:

    6 Safe Migraine Treatments for Pregnant Moms

    Women get the Lion’s Share of Migraines and Chronic Pain

    Sources:

    Babies’ Colic Linked to Mothers’ Migraines

    What kind of Doctor should I see for Migraines? Neurologists

    Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011


     


     

    If you suffer from headaches everyday, then you need to see a doctor for migraines immediately- you might be having migraine attacks, or another form of chronic headaches, like cluster headaches or rebound headaches.  If you’ve already seen a primary physician and are not happy with the results, it might be time to find a neurologist for migraine headaches.

    WHAT KIND OF DOCTOR SHOULD I SEE FOR MIGRAINES? NEUROLOGISTS, WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

    What is a neurologist?

    A neurologist is a physician who specializes in disorders of the brain, particularly the nervous system.  A competent neurologist treats patients who suffer from a wide range of conditions, including dementia, epilepsy, brain tumors, amnesia, and migraine disorder.

    What are the advantages to seeing a neurologist for migraines?

    For many migraine sufferers, visiting a neurologist that specializes in chronic headaches is an effective way to stay on top of their migraine symptoms and find out about new advances in migraine treatments.

    • By limiting his practice to the treatment of migraines, your neurologist has an in depth understanding of the neurological factors involved in migraine illness.
    • A migraine neurologist has the most up-to-date news in migraine treatments, coping mechanisms, and other resources.
    • Your neurologist is better able to diagnose migraine symptoms and comorbid conditions.
    • By establishing a patient-doctor bond with your neurologist, you will be in a good position to control your migraine triggers, learn how to manage your migraines on your own, make better lifestyle choices, and develop a strategy for preventing migraines that works.
    • In addition to prescribing migraine medications, your neurologist might suggest natural migraine ingredients, such as  vitamins, and herbs like butterbur, magnesium, riboflavin, and coenzyme Q10.

    WHAT KIND OF DOCTOR SHOULD I SEE FOR MIGRAINES? NEUROLOGISTS, WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

    Are there any disadvantages to choosing a neurologist?

    Choosing the right doctor is always hit or miss; you might find an excellent neurologist that understands your feelings and addresses your needs on the first visit, but it’s more likely that you will have to shop around.

    • First, ask up front if your neurologist treats migraine patients. Many neurologists reserve their time for individuals with other brain disorders, but not migraine disorder.
    • It’s possible that after the first visit, your doctor will tell you that your symptoms are not severe enough, and that he only treats migraine patients who experience migraine attacks on a more regular basis- assuming you get an initial appointment at all.
    • There are millions of migraine patients in the US, but only a handful of neurologists specializing in the field of chronic headaches and facial pain.  This is likely because there is very little government funding devoted to migraine research; as a result, there is little incentive for a doctor wishing to advance himself in medicine to choose migraine illness as his specialty.

    Where can I find a headache specialist or neurologist in my area?

    The internet is a great place to connect with other migraine sufferers and migraine advocacy groups. Here are a few sites that have search engines for locating a doctor to treat your migraines:

    U.S. Regional Migraine & Headache Clinics

    Find a Healthcare Professional

    National Headache Foundation

    Patient Recommended Migraine and Headache Specialists

    Read more about migraine treatments:

    What kind of Doctor should I see for Migraines? Headache Specialists

    What kind of Doctor should I see for Migraines? Primary Care Physicians

    Avoiding Migraine Triggers- Here, There and Everywhere

    Sources:

    Johns Hopkins Neurology/Neurosurgery- Headache Center- Migraine Headache

    Which Doctors Provide Migraine Treatment?

    Image credits, from top:

    jepoirrier, ShutterMoth