Posts Tagged ‘botox migraines’

Drugs that Prevent or Stop Migraine Attacks, plus Side Effects: Part II, Preventative Medications

Monday, January 2nd, 2012


 


 

Which migraine drugs are best for relieving migraine headaches and preventing migraine attacks? Below are the most popular migraine medications, including possible dangerous side effects.

DRUGS THAT PREVENT OR STOP MIGRAINE ATTACKS, PLUS SIDE EFFECTS, WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

From Part I:

Two strategies for migraine relief

  • Pain relief- Also known as acute or abortive treatment, these types of drugs are taken during migraine attacks and are designed to stop symptoms that have already begun.
  • Preventative- Prophylactic migraine drugs are taken regularly, usually every day, in order to reduce the frequency of migraine attacks.  Most prophylactic migraine medicines do not treat other migraine symptoms (nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, light sensitivity, migraine aura), but instead aid in preventing migraines by controlling vascular swelling.

Natural Migraine Remedies Surge with Prescription Drug Deaths

Migraine medications that prevent migraine attacks

If you suffer frequent debilitating migraine attacks that do not respond to pain relievers, then your doctor may wish to prescribe migraine prophylaxis treatments.  Also, “migraine with aura” patients qualify for preventative migraine treatments that reduce the frequency and duration of migraine attacks, in addition to significantly reducing the severity of migraine symptoms.

Heart disease medications

  • Beta blockers- Propranolol (Inderal La, Innopran XL)
  • Calcium channel blockers- Verapamil (Calan, Verelan)
  • Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors-  Lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril)

Caution: Cardiovascular medications for migraines may cause drug and alcohol interactions, dizziness, drowsiness, lightheadedness, wheezing, depression, vivid nightmares, cold hands and feet, asthma, diarrhea, nausea, slow heartbeat, and swollen ankles.

Antidepressants

  • Tricyclic antidepressants- Amitriptyline, nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil)
  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)- Paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), fluoxetine HCl (Prozac), Celexa
  • Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)- Venlafaxine (Effexor, Venlafaxine HCL)

Caution: Antidepressants may cause drug interactions.  Side effects include irregular heartbeat, dizziness, nausea, headache, fatigue, weakness, weight gain, increased appetite, reduced sex drive, and dry mouth.

DRUGS THAT PREVENT OR STOP MIGRAINE ATTACKS, PLUS SIDE EFFECTS, WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Anti-seizure medications

  • Valproate (Depacon)
  • Topiramate (Topamax)
  • Gabapentin (Neurontin)
  • Lamotrigine (Lamictal)

Caution: Anti-seizure medications for migraine may cause drug interactions.  Long-term use of anti-seizure medications may cause pancreatitis, liver damage, memory loss, nausea, vomiting, cramps, weight gain, impaired vision, hair loss, and dizziness.  Some epilepsy drugs like Depacon may cause birth defects if taken during pregnancy.

Migraine Medications That are Dangerous During Pregnancy

Antihistamines

  • Cyproheptadine

Caution: Antihistamines may cause drug interactions.  Side effects may include drowsiness, dizziness, nervousness, irritability, disorientation, hallucinations, insomnia, allergic reactions, impaired vision, tinnitus, low heartbeat, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, jaundice, hepatitis, anorexia, sore throat, chest pains, respiratory congestion, increased appetite, chills, and headache.

Botulinum toxin type A (Botox)

Caution: Botox injections may cause side effects like difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, muscular weakness, muscular pain, visual impairments, itching, irregular heartbeat, chest pain, bruising, bleeding, swelling, redness, sore throat, fever, cough, runny nose, flu symptoms, dizziness, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps, loss of appetite, dry mouth and eyes, tinnitus, increased sensitivity to light, and headache.

Alternative Migraine Treatments: Thinking outside of the Botox

DRUGS THAT PREVENT OR STOP MIGRAINE ATTACKS, PLUS SIDE EFFECTS, WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Alternative migraine nutrients

Natural ingredients for migraine headaches improve neurological functioning without dangerous side effects.

Herbs and vitamins for migraines

  • Butterbur
  • Magnesium
  • Coenzyme Q10
  • Riboflavin

Caution: Butterbur supplements may contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids- seek butterbur extracts that are free of hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. As with all medications, allergic reactions may occur.  Seek advice from a doctor before starting any new migraine treatment, including natural migraine remedies.

Read more about migraine medications:

Drugs that Prevent or Stop Migraine Attacks, plus Side Effects: Part I

How long will my Migraine Headache Last? A Migraine Symptom Chart

Sources:

Migraine, the National Migraine Association: Current Treatment Methods

Medications for Preventing Migraine Attacks

Drugs That Stop or Prevent Migraines

Migraine: Treatments and drugs – MayoClinic.com

Image credits, from top:

bored-nowKris Kesiak Photographyamortize

Drugs that Prevent or Stop Migraine Attacks, plus Side Effects: Part I, Pain Relief

Monday, January 2nd, 2012


 


 

Which migraine drugs are best for relieving migraine headaches, and which migraine treatments are best for preventing migraine attacks? Below are the most popular migraine medications, including possible dangerous side effects.

Part I: Migraine pain relievers

DRUGS THAT PREVENT OR STOP MIGRAINE ATTACKS, PLUS SIDE EFFECTS, WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Two strategies for migraine relief

  • Pain relief- Also known as acute or abortive treatment, these types of drugs are taken during migraine attacks and are designed to stop symptoms that have already begun.
  • Preventative- Prophylactic migraine drugs are taken regularly, usually every day, in order to reduce the frequency of migraine attacks.  Most prophylactic migraine medicines do not treat other migraine symptoms (nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, light sensitivity, migraine aura), but instead aid in preventing migraines by controlling vascular swelling.

Medications that relieve migraine symptoms

NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and simple analgesics

  • Ibuprofen- (Advil, Motrin, Nuprin)
  • Acetaminophen- (Tylenol)
  • Aspirin- (Bufferin, Bayer)
  • Ketoprofen- (Orudis)
  • Naproxen- (Naprosyn, Aleve)
  • Combination migraine painkillers- (Excedrin for Migraines)

Caution: Over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers are not strong enough to relieve severe migraine headaches.  Long-term side effects may include ulcers, internal bleeding, and rebound headache.

Are You on the Rebound with Your Headache?

DRUGS THAT PREVENT OR STOP MIGRAINE ATTACKS, PLUS SIDE EFFECTS, WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Narcotic painkillers for migraines

  • Codeine
  • Meperidine HCl (Demerol)
  • Darvocet
  • Butalbital, acetaminophen, caffeine (Fioricet)
  • Fiorinal
  • Percocet
  • Vicodin

Caution: Narcotic painkillers are habit forming and a high risk for fatal overdose; side effects include allergic reaction, seizure, feebleness, loss of consciousness, clammy skin, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps, shortness of breath, low blood pressure, anxiety, and increased sweating.

Are Doctors Overprescribing Painkillers for Migraines? Fox News Report

Triptans

  • Sumatriptan (Imitrex)
  • Rizatriptan (Maxalt)
  • Almotriptan (Axert)
  • Naratriptan (Amerge)
  • Zolmitriptan (Zomig)
  • Frovatriptan (Frova)
  • Eletriptan (Relpax)

Caution: Triptans may cause nausea, dizziness, and muscular feebleness, not recommended for patients of heart disease or stroke

Ergot

  • Ergotamine (Ergomar)
  • Dihydroergotamine (DHE, Migranal)

Caution: Side effects of Ergot may include vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, hypertension, chest pain, sneezing, sore throat, fever, visual impairments, numbness in hands and feet, cold hands and feet, weakness in legs, muscular pain, itching, dry mouth, disorientation, anxiety, and fatigue.

Anti-nausea

  • Metoclopramide (Reglan)
  • Prochlorperazine (Compro)

Caution: Anti-nausea medications may cause fatigue, diarrhea, dizziness, joint pain, restlessness, sleep difficulties, hair loss, anxiety, constipation, impaired vision, and headache.

Parenteral corticosteroids

  • Dexamethasone (Baycadron, Cortastat, Decadron, DexPak)

Caution: Dexamethasone may cause difficulty sleeping, disorientation, dizziness, increased appetite, increased sweating, indigestion, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, nervousness, depression, mood swings, allergic reaction, changes in menstruation, seizures, muscular pain, joint pain, unusual swelling, fever, sore throat, cough, pressure behind eyes, and headache.

Next: Drugs that Prevent or Stop Migraine Attacks, plus Side Effects: Part II, Preventative Medications

Read more about migraine medications:

Natural Supplements and Herbs for migraines

Coenzyme Q10 Benefits and Dosage Information

Sources:

Migraine, the National Migraine Association: Current Treatment Methods

Medications for Preventing Migraine Attacks

Drugs That Stop or Prevent Migraines

Migraine: Treatments and drugs – MayoClinic.com

Image credits, from top:

psyberartist, Destinys Agent,

Still on the Fence about Botox for Headache Relief? Read what Scientists and Skeptics have to Say

Monday, May 2nd, 2011


 


 

More chronic migraine headache patients are using Botox as a migraine treatment, but skeptics still worry about reported side effects linked with Botox injections. Do you suffer from low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) headaches? If so, researchers are convinced that regular injections of Botox treatments can end your pounding migraine headache symptoms for good. Even if the headaches which plague you aren’t specifically CSF headaches, there’s still a good chance that Botox health benefits still apply to you, according to scientists like Michal Cutrer, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurologist.
STILL ON THE FENCE ABOUT BOTOX FOR HEADACHE RELIEF? READ WHAT SCIENTISTS AND SKEPTICS HAVE TO SAY, WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Scientific study finds that Botox injections excel at providing headache relief

A recent study focused on a chronic headache patient who had been suffering from low cerebrospinal fluid headaches for over 20 years. CSF headaches are caused by leakage of cerebrospinal fluids, causing a decrease in brain pressure while the patient is standing or sitting upright. CSF headache symptoms vary according to the severity of the condition. In this study, the patient had been experiencing excruciating pain for half of her lifetime.

Because of the nature of CSF headaches, the sufferer can only experience headache relief while lying completely flat. According to the World Headache Alliance, migraine headaches such as CSF are among the top 20 causes of disability.

Migraine Pop Quiz: How Well do you Understand your Headaches?

Dr. Cutrer has been testing the effects of Botox headache treatments on migraine patients with low cerebrospinal fluids. What he discovered was that Botox injections were able to relieve pain more effectively than any other migraine treatment. On a scale of 1 to 10, with a 10 being the most debilitating level of pain, patients who received Botox treatments went from an 8 to a 2 or 3.

Dr. Cutrer is quick to point out that Botox treatments are not a cure for migraine headaches; once the patient stops treatment, the headaches will return.

Are there any dangerous side effects associated with Botox treatments?

There have been several allegations and studies which have pointed to negative side effects of frequent Botox usage. Recently, Allergan, a manufacturer of Botox, was sued and settled for over $200 million in a case which attempted to link Botox with the brain damage of a senior citizen. Others have reported side effects such as bruising, speech impediments and skin rash. And recently, a study published by Social Psychological and Personality Science made the claim that overuse of Botox injections can lead to emotional problems.

Read: Considering Botox for Headache Relief? Read This First…

While the FDA stands behind the decision to approve the use of Botox for chronic migraine treatment, patients are still warned about possible adverse reactions. According to the warning label, botulinum toxins can leak to other parts of the body and produce symptoms similar to botulism, such as difficulty breathing, and can be life-threatening.

Also read: New Study Warns against Taking these Painkillers with Antidepressants

Sources:

Huffington Post, LA Times, FDA

Considering Botox for Headache Relief? Read This First…

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011


 


 

Botox injections aren’t only used by celebrities such as Kim Kardashian to remove wrinkles and laugh lines; since the FDA’s approval of Botox (botulinum toxin) treatments for headache relief, many chronic migraine sufferers have been flocking to their nearest plastic surgery practitioner for their tri-monthly injections.

CONSIDERING BOTOX FOR HEADACHE RELIEF? READ THIS FIRST..., WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Kim Kardashian

Read: Botox for Migraines: Is it Safe?

Botox essentially works by blocking nerves, paralyzing certain facial muscles, and thus eliminating even fine wrinkles caused by laughing, frowning, sleeping or weeping. Overuse of botox treatments often results in a “plastic” expression, as exhibited by celebrities such as Michael Jackson: a face devoid of emotion.

Study reveals unhealthy side effects of Botox injections

A new study reveals another surprising and disturbing side effect of Botox treatments: an inability to perceive emotions in others. The same drug which reduces one’s ability to express emotions like sadness, happiness, fear or anger might also impair that person’s ability to understand similar emotional signals from their peers.

  • The study, published by Social Psychological and Personality Science, was conducted by researchers from USC and Duke University in an attempt to understand why similar dermal fillers such as Restylane or Juvederm have no such correlation with emotional aptitude.
  • USC psychology professor David T. Neal believes it is Botox’s specific ability to freeze facial muscles which hampers one’s ability to perceive others’ facial expressions.
  • People learn how to express, label and understand emotions through mimicry (monkey see, monkey do).  We smile when we’re happy because we see other people smiling while in a good mood, and we understand the connection. But take away the ability to smile, to express similar feelings of gratitude or satisfaction, and that connection is lost.
CONSIDERING BOTOX FOR HEADACHE RELIEF? READ THIS FIRST..., WWW.MIGRAVENT.COM

Michael Jackson

  • In this study, women who used Restylane to remove wrinkles demonstrated emotional aptitude of 77 percent accuracy.
  • Women who opted for Botox treatments were presented with photographs exhibiting facial expressions; only 70 percent of participants who received Botox injections were accurate in perceiving emotions.
  • This new research suggests that there is a flip side to the mind/body connection; that in some situations, it is the body which has a direct effect on the mind. Read more about “embodiment” at the National Center for Biotechnology Information.
  • Many neuroscientists attribute “mirroring” to a brain circuit which helps us understand feelings and motives of others, an essential tool which is deadened by frequent Botox injections.
  • Other possible side effects of excessive Botox usage include speech impediments, bruising, redness, muscular weakness or hives.

Also read:

Relieve Your Headaches With Yoga: Try These Moves!

Celebrities Also Suffer from Migraines

Sources:

LA Times, Web MD, USA Today, Health.com